NICOLE BOLIAUX

Swaying on your board, cold winds chilling your face, the only part of you not covered in a wet suit, you look back at the next set of waves headed towards the shore of Klitmøller. You paddle as the wave swells, and then pushes yourself up, riding the wave in. The icy cold waters lapping at your feet. This is what is drawing surfers and their young families to the edge of Denmark.

Tucked into Thy National Park, sits Klitmøller. This traditional fishing village, home to many families that have lived there for generations, has undergone significant change in the last ten years.

Due to wind patterns and its unique environment, Klitmøller has transformed into one of Europe’s foremost windsurfing spots, earning the nickname of Cold Hawaii. Cold Hawaii spans from Agger in the south to Hanstholm in the North with Klitmøller as it’s symbolic capitol. With 29 registered surf spots along the length of Cold Hawaii, it is easy to find the perfect wave. It is like Hawaii, just significantly colder.

Surfers discovered Klitmøller in the late 80’s and since have brought surfers from around the world to test the waters. Since 2010, 54 new people moved into the town of just over 800, most young surfers and their families moving from bigger cities to the quiet of Klitmøller. 

Klitmøller seen from the dunes

Klitmøller seen from the dunes

A surfer heads to the Bunker, a surf spot south of Klitmøller. 

Anna Larsson tends to her two month old while her boyfriend Victor Rosario tickles their youngest son Elliot in their hometown of Klitmøller, known to many as Cold Hawaii due to its perfect surfing conditions. Larsson is originally from Sweden and met Ros

Anna Larsson tends to her two month old while her boyfriend Victor Rosario tickles their youngest son Elliot in their hometown of Klitmøller, known to many as Cold Hawaii due to its perfect surfing conditions. Larsson is originally from Sweden and met Ros

One of the main concerns about the influx of surfers was that the beach where the fishermen keep their ships would be destroyed, but over a decade later it is still preserved. 

Anna, who has surfed her whole life, prepares to head out to sea while on holiday with her family. Due to cold water, surfers wear wetsuits, caps and gloves to protect themselves. 

A child straps on his safety rope before heading out to paddle board on the reef as part of a instructional camp for kids on holiday in Klitmøller, nicknamed Cold Hawaii due to its great surfing conditions. Located on the west coast of Denmark, Klitmøller
A child straps on his safety rope before heading out to paddle board on the reef as part of a instructional camp for kids on holiday in Klitmøller, nicknamed Cold Hawaii due to its great surfing conditions. Located on the west coast of Denmark, Klitmøller

The sunset reflects in the windows of an old fishing shed.

Boots lay about at the Larsson's house.

Sunset over Klitmøller.

Victoria and Fanny run from the wave while on Autumn holiday in Klitmøller.

Foam on the sea during low tide.

Seagulls fly over old fishing sheds right off the beach.

Prints from seagulls and surfers left in the sand.

A child plays on a suspended net in the bunker as surfers enjoy the waves out at sea.

A surfer runs to catch the waves. 

Jan Johansan, right, and Jole Anderson untangle fish from their net in Klitmøller, nicknamed Cold Hawaii due to its great surfing conditions. Both men fish recreationally and were aiming to catch Herring for their Christmas dinner, but caught mostly Macker

The lookout over the beach and the rolling sand dunes.

A wetsuit hangs out to dry during the day.

The tide rolls back out to sea.

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