Courier Journal: Months 7-10

Alex Croley, 46, lives in Audubon Park and walks almost a mile to and from Aldi with a cart to buy groceries for himself and his disabled mother because they do not own a car. He stops at a bus stop to rest a knee injury.

Left: Dalen Lieffring, 24, lives in Old Louisville. The closest grocery store to him, right, was the Krogeron 2nd Street and Brighton Drive which closed down earlier this year. Lieffring, who is a student and works part time, recently bought a car due to the high cost of transportation and added time to and from the grocery.

Right: Dana Thompson, 36, lives in Russell and due to her disability, uses the Sister Visitor Center’s food pantry, left. Thompson regularly relies on friends and family for rides to get groceries. Her diabetes and gastroparesis make finding food she can eat difficult.

Left: Ebonne Ingram-Jones, lives in Shawnee, but shops in New Albany because she says she can’t get what she need at the two Krogers in the west end. She comments over the Sherman Minton Bridge, right.

Left: Eunice Johnson, 63, lives in Russell with her husband and 9-year-old grandson. She takes the TARC 3, right, to get to store, pong $3 each way.

Left: Heather Hawthorne, 34, lives in Fern Creek and drives 20 minutes to Walmart. Hawthorne lives on a plot of land passed down by her grandfather and believes the space is an acceptable trade off for the commute to the store.

Mayo Cemetery in Prestonsburg, Ky. on Jan. 8, 2019.

Third Avenue Freewill Baptist in Prestonsburg, Ky. on Jan. 8, 2019.

Beatyville, Ky. on Jan. 9, 2019. Three Forks Regional Jail, in Lee County, was under quarantine in September 2018 due to Hepatitis A.

Los Angeles Angels prospect, centerfielder Jo Adell, 19, runs hitting drills in the baseball fieldhouse at Ballard High School in Louisville, Ky. on Jan. 29, 2019. The Los Angeles Angels drafted Adell with a 10th overall selection from Ballard High School in 2017.

Los Angeles Angels prospect, centerfielder Jo Adell, 19, stands for a portrait in the baseball locker room at Ballard High School in Louisville, Ky. on Jan. 29, 2019. The Los Angeles Angels drafted Adell with a 10th overall selection from Ballard High School in 2017.

Los Angeles Angels prospect, centerfielder Jo Adell, 19, stands for a portrait in the baseball dugout at Ballard High School in Louisville, Ky. on Jan. 29, 2019. The Los Angeles Angels drafted Adell with a 10th overall selection from Ballard High School in 2017.

Los Angeles Angels prospect, centerfielder Jo Adell, 19, trains at Personal Fitness & Rehabilitation in Louisville, Ky. on Jan. 29, 2019. The Los Angeles Angels drafted Adell with a 10th overall selection from Ballard High School in 2017.

Los Angeles Angels prospect, centerfielder Jo Adell, 19, runs hitting drills in the baseball fieldhouse at Ballard High School in Louisville, Ky. on Jan. 29, 2019. The Los Angeles Angels drafted Adell with a 10th overall selection from Ballard High School in 2017.

Los Angeles Angels prospect, centerfielder Jo Adell, 19, left, trains with Eric Hammer, director of human performance, right, at Personal Fitness & Rehabilitation in Louisville, Ky. on Jan. 29, 2019. The Los Angeles Angels drafted Adell with a 10th overall selection from Ballard High School in 2017. Hammer has been working with Adell since he was in middle school.

Photo illustration using poetry written by young women in the Louisville Metro Youth Detention Services in a creative writing class led by Tasha Golden,  founder of Project Uncaged, an arts-based trauma-informed program that aims to amplify young women’s stories, in Louisville, Ky.

Photo illustration using poetry written by young women in the Louisville Metro Youth Detention Services in a creative writing class led by Tasha Golden,  founder of Project Uncaged, an arts-based trauma-informed program that aims to amplify young women’s stories, in Louisville, Ky.

Photo illustration using poetry written by young women in the Louisville Metro Youth Detention Services in a creative writing class led by Tasha Golden,  founder of Project Uncaged, an arts-based trauma-informed program that aims to amplify young women’s stories, in Louisville, Ky.

The last few months have been very busy. Filled with projects from all directions. I finished off 2018 with a project with one of my favorite writers, Bailey Loosemore on food insecurity in Louisville. Food deserts are food insecurity are a hard thing to visualize, so I was happy to be able to work closely with Bailey and create diptychs that helped better illustrate who was affected across our city. 

I started 2019 with a trip to Eastern Kentucky working on a story about Kentucky’s Hep A outbreak. The landscape of the area really struck me. One both of these stories I was able to work with members of our talented photo team here at the CJ, Matt Stone and Michael Clevenger respectively. 

A story I have been working on in my spare time on Jecorey “1200” Arthur finally published as well. 

Then, I was happy to hear from the wonderful Sammy Jo Hester for a freelance assignment focused on Jo Adell, who was very sweet and great to work with. 

Lastly, a project I worked on with Maggie Menderski on girls in the Louisville Metro Youth Detention Services who use poetry as an outlet just published. Tasha Golden works with groups of girls to help provide a platform to raise their voices. These girls write beautiful poetry and it was an honor to sit with them and create. 

Lots of new work. Lots of collaboration. Not a lot of sleep.


As always, thank you so much for stopping by. 

Love,

Nik


Courier Journal: Months 3-6

Howdy,

It’s been awhile. So, months 3-5 at the CJ are in the bag. They were filled with three large projects (one publishing dec 12), dailies, breaking news and large news events. From Detroit to Jeffersontown, these few months have been packed with so much news. The heartbreaking shooting at the Kroger here in Kentucky rattled our little area, especially when the shooting in Pittsburgh happened just days later. 

Also during this time, we celebrated the 150th anniversary of our newspaper. I worked on many videos for the party as well as for articles on our site. Being able to sit down with some of my coworkers and talk to them about their time at the CJ and their incredible experiences over decades left me even more proud and honored to work here.

Up next: Two large projects and December. 

As always,

Love,

Nik


Courier Journal: The Beginning

Josh Tillman of Father John Misty performs on the Mast Stage during the first day of Forecastle in Louisville, Ky. on Friday, July 13, 2018.

Fans cheer as Josh Tillman of Father John Misty performs on the Mast Stage during the first day of Forecastle in Louisville, Ky. on Friday, July 13, 2018.

Michael Anderson, 67, sits for a portrait in his home in Louisville, Ky. on Monday, July 16, 2018. Anderson deals with a chronic pain condition and when the pain clinic he attended shuttered its doors, he was left without someone to prescribe his pain medication, leaving him to cut back on his dosage to save enough to get him through.

Hina Baloch from Islamabad, Pakistan has been in the Courier Journal newsroom for a few weeks with the US-Pakistan Professional Partnership in Journalism.

Tia Coleman, a survivor of the Ride the Ducks duck boat accident that left 17 dead on Thursday, cries as her doctor Dr. Brian Clonts, attending physician at Cox Medical Center Branson, takes her back to her room after a press conference at the Cox Medical Center Branson on Saturday, July 21, 2018 in Branson, Mo. Coleman lost 9 family member in the tragedy.

Tia Coleman, a survivor of the Ride the Ducks duck boat accident that left 17 dead on Thursday, laughs while remembering the last good moments with her family before the accident while speaking to members of the media about her experience during a press conference at the Cox Medical Center Branson on Saturday, July 21, 2018 in Branson, Mo. Coleman lost 9 family member in the tragedy.

Robert Montgomery of Branson, left, sings Amazing Grace along with hundreds of community members gathered in the parking lot outside Ride the Ducks, lighting candles and placing flowers on the cars of two victims from the duck boat accident in Branson, Mo. on Friday, July 20, 2018. On Thursday, July 19, 2018 17 people were killed when a duck boat, an amphibious vehicle, capsized in the Table Rock Lake in Branson.

Children sign posters with messages for the victims of the duck boat crash outside Ride the Ducks in Branson, Mo. on Friday, July 20, 2018. On Thursday, July 19, 2018 17 people were killed when a duck boat, an amphibious vehicle, capsized in the Table Rock Lake in Branson.

300 community members gathered in the parking lot outside Ride the Ducks, lighting candles and placing flowers on the cars of two victims from the duck boat accident in Branson, Mo. on Friday, July 20, 2018. On Thursday, July 19, 2018 17 people were killed when a duck boat, an amphibious vehicle, capsized in the Table Rock Lake in Branson.

Oh man. It’s been a quick and long two months so far in Louisville.
It’s been awhile since I’ve used this part of my website, but I thought it’d be
a great way to keep track of time and chronicle my time at the Courier-Journal.

It’s insane to me that three months ago I was “freelancing,”
mostly working at a restaurant, over 1,500 miles away, yearning to do the work
I love but not being able to take time off from waitressing to work on
projects. Now, though my days are long, and I might be a bit stressed and
tired, my days are filled with wonderful projects and exciting new endeavors.

I’m incredibly grateful to have already been able to work on so
many important stories and enterprise projects in this short amount of time.

June was filled with research and the start of many projects to
come. I met the world’s sweetest family and am excited to work with them in the
years to come.

July was non-stop. It’s safe to say I’ve thrown myself
head-first into this new role and the news machine was happy to keep all of our
plates full over the month. It started with some fun videos at Forecastle, our
big local music festival, including an intimate set with Houndmouth’s Matt Myers which was quickly followed by a large breaking news
project in Branson, Missouri after a tragedy leading to the death of 17 people.
Working for a paper that’s a part of a larger network allows us a lot more
support and resources. Thanks to Gannett and the USA Today Network, Morgan Watkins
and I were able to go help out the Springfield News-Leader. Their smaller staff
needed some support and relief after working long hours covering such a large
news story.

The heartbreak in the Branson community was evident from the
moment we crossed the border into the city. I’m incredibly proud of the hard
work of the Springfield staff and the devotion they had to this story.

From there, I jumped back into the daily swing in Louisville,
driving all over the area working on projects (to come).

Above you can see photos and videos from my first two months (and
below, a small section of personal iPhone images). So much time and heart has
gone into each.

Thank you for stopping by for a bit and sticking through my
ramblings. Hopefully I can make this a regular posting again.

As always,

Love,

Nikki

SJ and Sunnies

Red River Gorge Recordings

B-roll Breaks

Photogs in Training

The Devers

Dante the Donkey

The light in my apartment

Best Friends Visits

Using Format